Don’t panic! 6 ways to still score a summer internship

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The semester is almost over, and some of us are beginning to realize great intentions don’t always mean great results. Maybe we’ve not invested as much time into searching for an internship, or maybe we already were accepted into an internship but really didn’t like it. Whatever the reason to begin your hunt now, it’s not too late, and the Daily Clog has come up with six emergency tips to get those plans for summer finalized:

1. Target small businesses or organizations that don’t have a formal application deadline.

Instead of  ”Deadline: September 2013″ you’ll see “Deadline: ASAP” — beautiful, right? Smaller organizations tend not to have standardized internship programs and are therefore less likely to have a formal application deadline. This would typically include nonprofit organizations and startups — both of which the Bay Area has plenty. Check out theIdealist.org website for a list of nongovernmental organization internships and Internmatch.com for a list of startup companies for summer 2014.

2. Use your resume as a door opener.

Your resume is your foot in the door — having a powerful resume can be the decisive factor in whether you’re able to snag an opportunity or not. The staggering truth is recruiters will typically only spend six seconds on your resume. It’s important to realize that resumes are not typically used to gauge your suitability for a position but to find reasons to eliminate you. Make sure you use all the resources available (e.g. Career Center workshops, department workshops, Callisto, ect.) to make your resume as flawless as possible.

2. Use your resume as a door opener.

Your resume is your foot in the door — having a powerful resume can be the decisive factor in whether you’re able to snag an opportunity or not. The staggering truth is recruiters will typically only spend six seconds on your resume. It’s important to realize that resumes are not typically used to gauge your suitability for a position but to find reasons to eliminate you. Make sure you use all the resources available (e.g. Career Center workshops, department workshops, Callisto, ect.) to make your resume as flawless as possible.

4. Utilize your network!

An ABC News report shows that 80 percent of jobs are found through networking! Sitting behind a computer screen and searching for internships is great, and maybe you’ll find something, but there is a higher likelihood that you’ll actually be successful if you get out there and talk to people. Reach out to professors, classmates, even your family friends, casually mentioning to them that you’re looking for a summer internship in a particular field — you’d be surprised at what unlikely, obscure corners opportunities could be lurking in and how many people will be willing to help you.

5. Keep in touch with your dream internship in case an unexpected opening arises.

You might have missed the deadline or the company’s quota for interns may already be filled, but if an intern suddenly decides to drop out, who is the employer going to contact next? Obviously, charming-albeit-slightly-annoying person who keeps calling the office to express an ardent desire to intern for the company — you!

6. Use the Career Center.

Yes — it is still offering help to those of us who are a little late in getting in on the game. Employers and internship recruiters are connected with the Career Center directly, which means it has the inside scoop on still-available opportunities. You should also crash the “Just in Time Job Fair” — granted, it’s for jobs, but you might be able to talk to some of the employers about possible internships. April 16 is dedicated to engineering, science and technical opportunities, and April 17 is dedicated to business, nonprofit and public service opportunities. Both fairs run from 11 a.m.  to 3 p.m.

And BAM — you’ve got yourself an internship before you know it.

 Contact Tala Katarina Ram at tram@dailycal.org.

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